Saturday, February 22, 2014

The Congressional Budget Office's Report on the Minimum Wage

There's been a lot of talk lately about a rise in the minimum wage to $10.10 an hour. Just for giggles and grins I thought I'd look up the Congressional Budget Office's report on it. The first part is kind of the 'executive summary' and the box is the full report.
Still think this country can't afford to raise the minimum wage?


What Options for Increasing the Minimum Wage Did CBO Examine?

For this report, CBO examined the effects on employment and family income of two options for increasing the federal minimum wage (see the figure below):
  • A “$10.10 option” would increase the federal minimum wage from its current rate of $7.25 per hour to $10.10 per hour in three steps—in 2014, 2015, and 2016. After reaching $10.10 in 2016, the minimum wage would be adjusted annually for inflation as measured by the consumer price index.
  • A “$9.00 option” would raise the federal minimum wage from $7.25 per hour to $9.00 per hour in two steps—in 2015 and 2016. After reaching $9.00 in 2016, the minimum wage would not be subsequently adjusted for inflation.
  • What Effects Would Those Options Have?

    The $10.10 option would have substantially larger effects on employment and income than the $9.00 option would—because more workers would see their wages rise; the change in their wages would be greater; and, CBO expects, employment would be more responsive to a minimum-wage increase that was larger and was subsequently adjusted for inflation. The net effect of either option on the federal budget would probably be small.
    Effects of the $10.10 Option on Employment and Income
    Once fully implemented in the second half of 2016, the $10.10 option would reduce total employment by about 500,000 workers, or 0.3 percent, CBO projects (see the table below). As with any such estimates, however, the actual losses could be smaller or larger; in CBO’s assessment, there is about a two-thirds chance that the effect would be in the range between a very slight reduction in employment and a reduction in employment of 1.0 million workers.
    • Once the increases and decreases in income for all workers are taken into account, overall real income would rise by $2 billion.
    • Real income would increase, on net, by $5 billion for families whose income will be below the poverty threshold under current law, boosting their average family income by about 3 percent and moving about 900,000 people, on net, above the poverty threshold (out of the roughly 45 million people who are projected to be below that threshold under current law).
    • Families whose income would have been between one and three times the poverty threshold would receive, on net, $12 billion in additional real income. About $2 billion, on net, would go to families whose income would have been between three and six times the poverty threshold.
    • Real income would decrease, on net, by $17 billion for families whose income would otherwise have been six times the poverty threshold or more, lowering their average family income by 0.4 percent

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